December 13, 2019

29 thoughts on “Homemade Silicon ICs / Computer Chips

  1. Impressive. I was still surprised at the person a few years ago that first demonstrated this kind of manufacturing using home equipment. It looked so incredibly challenging I didn't think it would go much past that point.

    I'm glad to be proven wrong…

  2. "I etched my own PCBs, wow! Let's see how to design and etch my own ICs now, can't be that hard!" – two years of learning Verilog later – "Alright, I can design, let's build it!" – sees the video – "Alright, let's NOT do that!"

  3. 1:50
    One of these things is not like the others… One of these things just doesn't belong…
    One of these things I am drinking right now. Phosphoric acid isn't harmful (not beyond being pretty bad for your teeth, anyway). It's in Coca Cola.

  4. 1:26
    Hmm, yes, just casually picked up an electron microscope like it's a carton of milk. Where the heck can you just "pick up" an electron microscope? What sort of place sells them?

  5. Been wondering why a 1-2um fab doesn't go full digital masks and offer small volume IC's. Lots of fun analog and sensing things that could be done. With a standard package and bond-pad layout, it could be highly automated. Say, a transparent TQFP-44 with a central thermal ground pad or some transparent QFN package.

  6. Congratulations Sam. You are absolutely positive crazy engineer to built all that laboratory and get succeed. It is really appreciated. I was excitted during my electronics studies when we had to prepare Si wafer and then make simple p-n junction but I have to admit that equipment/laboratory which we had at university were much less advanced than yours private one at home. Once again good luck with further projects. Simon (Poland)

  7. How did you manage to do that in your home. To manually fabricate the ic, you need a clean room which costs a ton of money to build. I see no clean room in your home, and why aren't you in any form of suit. People who do such stuff, wear full body suits to prevent dust from accumulating during fab.

  8. man that looks amazing, i always loved the gold plated look of older ICs. i got a 68k in that style
    i hope you get a lot more ICs done in the future. maybe you can even build an entire 8 bit computer with self made chips. (maybe you even get it small enough to either fit on a sindle die, or use multiple dies on one chip and connect them to eachother)

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